Latin American Network Information Center - LANIC

-DATE-
19881007
-YEAR-
1988
-DOCUMENT_TYPE-
REMARKS
-AUTHOR-
F.CASTRO
-HEADLINE-
CASTRO SAID TO OPPOSE RIOTS AFTER NO-VOTE VICTOR
-PLACE-
CHILE
-SOURCE-
MADRID EFE
-REPORT_NBR-
FBIS
-REPORT_DATE-
19881011
-TEXT-
Castro Said To Oppose Riots After No-Vote Victory

PY0810180488 Madrid EFE in Spanish 2117 GMT 7 Oct 88

[Quotation marks as received]

[Text] Buenos Aires, 7 Oct (EFE)--An envoy from Fidel Castro traveled to
Chile at the end of September "to convey" the Cuban president's opposition
to any "violent mobilization" if the no-vote were to win the plebiscite.

This information was published on the front page of today's issue of the
newspaper EL HERALDO DE BUENOS AIRES.  The paper adds that on 23 September
the envoy--without giving any details--met with a "high-ranking Argentine
Government official to inform him of his mission on this part of the
continent.

The newspaper says the contents of the meeting were leaked by a
"responsible source" from the Argentine secret service.  The source added
that "the Argentine Government agreed with Cuban position."

The source said:  "The envoy's secret mission was extended in order to meet
with local communists in Buenos Aires to try to persuade them not to issue
declarations calling for an armed insurrection in the Southern Cone."

The source cited by the newspaper said "at the same time we were able to
detect increased activity of the most important secret services of the
world" in Chile.

The source added that these services "reported to their governments that
former Chilean Interior Minister Sergio Jarpa Reyes had met with moderate
sectors of Pinochet government's to convince them that it is important to
become part of a transition government.

According to the source, "Jarpa's point of view has many followers within
Pinochet's government.  On 5 October, Jarpa met with some of the adherents
and an officer close to the president" to begin building "bridges" between
the two sectors.

The source said:  "Our contacts assured us that a majority in the Chilean
Armed Forces, although still hurting from the defeat, favor what is being
called a political solution to the institutional situation of the country."
-END-


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